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What Can You Use Very Small Acres Of Land For?

Contrary to what you might have heard, you don’t need hundreds of acres to generate money with your land. Even small acreage can be put to good use, and earn you a nice return at the same time. While you won’t be able to run a large-scale farming operation, you do have the option to start a micro-farm or use the property in a variety of other ways.

Here are some uses for very small acres of land:


Over the last two decades, the number of traditional farms in the United States has dropped 50%. As larger, conventional farms start to decline, a bigger trend is starting to grow: micro-farming. Rather than working on hundreds of acres, these microforms may only be farming on an acre or two. Many of these farms are popping up in and around the outskirts of larger cities and towns.

It’s amazing how productive just a small plot of land can be. You don’t need hundreds of acres to grow crops. Merely focusing on a few profitable crops can help you not only put your land to good use, but make a profit as well.
Four specialty crops that are popular on microforms include garlic, bamboo, oyster mushrooms and ginseng. All of these plants are easy to grow, have large enough demand to allow for profitable prices, and are considered high-value crops.

Bamboo, in particular, is very profitable. A single bamboo potted plant can retail for as much as $150.
If you always dreamed of having your own farm, but simply cannot afford to buy the massive acreage that comes along with it, consider micro-farming. One to two acres is all you need to put your land to work and earn a decent income from it.

Boarding Animals

It may also be possible to offer boarding services for animals. Depending on your budget, you may be able to board pets, like cats and dogs, or larger animals, like horses. You’ll need some experience and shelter for the animals if you hope to make this venture work.

Boarding services are in high demand as pet owners need someone to look after their animals while on vacation or at work during the day. If local demand is high enough, you could earn a full-time income this way. And you don’t a lot of acreage either. However, if you plan on boarding horses, there may be restrictions on how many acres your property needs to have to legally board these animals.

Build a Home

Of course, you can always build a home on very small acres of land. If you’re purchasing a vacant lot, this will likely be your top priority if you’re using the land for personal purposes. As an investment, you may also consider building a home and either selling it, or renting it to tenants to earn a nice, consistent return.

Raise Goats and Chickens

While you may not be able to raise cattle, horses or other large animals, you can likely raise goats and chickens on just a few acres of land. Goats can provide you with fresh milk, while chickens can provide eggs. Eggs can be sold at the market, but you’ll need to check with local regulations if you plan on selling goats milk. Raw milk is not legally allowed to be sold in many areas of the country.

If you can’t sell milk, you may be able to set up a small petting zoo. If you decide to go this route, you may want to purchase additional animals. Make sure that your animals are well-socialized and comfortable being around people. Because a petting zoo can be a complicated venture, you may want to consult with an expert on the details of setting up this type of business.


If you have what it takes, you can use your small acreage for homesteading. You’ll need to put in a lot of hard work, but it’s possible to grow enough food to sustain a family on an acre or less. Consider building a greenhouse to grow food during the cold winter season, and selling any excess crops at local markets.

Homesteading will require a great deal of planning if you hope to truly be self-sufficient. You’ll need to consider where you’ll get your power from, and how much food you’ll need to realistically grow to support your family. Solar panels are a great way to get the power you need, but some homesteaders also use wind power to generate electricity, but this may be a costly venture.

Solar Farm

Speaking of solar power, if you have 10 acres, you may be able to start up a solar power farm. The excess power you generate can be sold to the electric company to generate income. This may not be a viable option for just one or two acres, but can work if you have 5-10 acres of land. Be sure to check local laws and regulations to ensure that this type of venture is plausible.

Flat land in desert areas are typically the best options for solar farms as they tend to get the most sun. If your lot is heavily-treed, you’ll need to clear it before you can start up a farm such as this. Also, if you live in an area that does not get a lot of sun, a solar farm may not be the ideal option.

There’s a lot you can do with small acreage. From micro-farming to boarding animals, building a home, homesteading and starting a solar farm, it’s possible to generate income from just a small piece of land. The key is finding the right venture that suits your lifestyle and needs. Micro-farming and similar ventures require a lot of hard work, but can result in a full-time income. Solar farming is virtually hands-off and may be the better option for investors who are pressed for time.

You don’t need hundreds of acres to see a return on your investment. Even just a few acres can be very productive if you have a good plan in place and the right idea.